‘Vodka Bog’ a Sweet Slog

Cranberry punchCranberries star in sauce on most Thanksgiving tables, but there’s no reason to stop there. This “Vodka Bog” punch from More Thoughts for Buffets (Institute Publishing) gets its kick and distinctive rosy hue from cranberry juice as well as cranberry liqueur. The book, first published in 1958 and updated in 1984, gathers recipes from “a renowned group of Chicago hostesses” who are not named but do test each recipe in their “hospitable homes” (um, was this was updated from the 1950s?)

In the book, the Vodka Bog is part of a Sunday Night Barbecue menu with taco dip and barbecued skirt steak, but it seems equally appropriate for the cocktail-and-football prelude to Thanksgiving dinner. For variation, use ginger or orange liqueur instead of cranberry liqueur. Adjust the sweetness with club soda. Step away from the oven, fill up a pitcher, and start the holiday.

Vodka Bog (1984)
(Serves 15 to 20)

1 fifth vodka
4 ounces cranberry liqueur
2 quarts cranberry juice
1 (6 ounce) can frozen concentrated orange juice, undiluted
2 to 3 (1 liter each) bottles club soda, or to taste
Orange slices, for garnish

In a large container, mix together the vodka, cranberry liqueur, juice and concentrate. Pour into a decorative pitcher. Add ice and club soda just before serving. Garnish with orange slices. Or serve in a punch bowl with an ice ring.

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About heritagerecipebox

I am named after my great-grandmother, who only prepared two dishes, according to anyone who remembers: hamburgers shaped like squares and peanut butter sandwiches. Fast forward 100 years and 500 miles north from my hometown of Richmond, Virginia to Boston, Massachusetts. Somehow, I ended up with a cooking gene as well as an interest in history and family stories. I have worked as a journalist and published three cookbooks plus a memoir. This blog gives me a chance to share family recipes and stories -- and other American recipes with a past. What do you have to share?
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