6-4-2-1 Equals a Family Cocktail

6-4 family drink 2The recipe paper-clipped inside one of my grandmother’s cooking pamphlets sounds like a scientific formula: 6 orange juice, 4 ging, 2 vermouth, 1 lemon. Though I can’t remember anyone making this drink – much the name of it – I pulled out a measuring cup and cocktail shaker to test it out. In went orange juice, ginger ale, vermouth, and fresh lemon juice. Out came a bland, citrusy cocktail that needed more oomph. An ounce or two of ginger liqueur or vodka did the trick.

The recipe, typewritten of the back of a note pad from an insurance company in Richmond, Virginia, dates back to the 1930s. My family likely made it soon after prohibition ended in 1933. I imagine them raising a glass beneath my great-uncle’s bead-and-wire mobile and toasting to a good year. I gladly did the same.

6-4 family drink recipe

Family Cocktail (1930s)
Serves 4

6 ounces (3/4 cup) orange juice
4 ounces (1/2 cup) ginger ale
2 ounces (1/4 cup) Vermouth
1 ounce (2 tablespoons) freshly-squeezed lemon juice

Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker and shake until well mixed. Serve over ice.

Broad_Street,_Richmond,_Virginia,_ca_1920s_1

 

Advertisements

About heritagerecipebox

I am named after my great-grandmother, who only prepared two dishes, according to anyone who remembers: hamburgers shaped like squares and peanut butter sandwiches. Fast forward 100 years and 500 miles north from my hometown of Richmond, Virginia to Boston, Massachusetts. Somehow, I ended up with a cooking gene as well as an interest in history and family stories. I have worked as a journalist and published three cookbooks plus a memoir. This blog gives me a chance to share family recipes and stories -- and other American recipes with a past. What do you have to share?
This entry was posted in cocktails, Food, History, memoir and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s