Snow Blower Cocktail for Patriots Fans

snow-blower-cocktail-5Since I live in the capital of Patriots Nation, I could hardly pass up a chance to serve my Super Bowl crowd a locally themed cocktail to supplement our beer. I found my recipe in the St. Jean’s Book of Favorite Recipes (1982) from Newton, Massachusetts. St. Jean’s Catholic Church formed in the 1890s heart of the Nonantum section’s French-Canadian community.The church has since closed, but the cookbook reflects the mix of immigrants that once lived in the neighborhood – mostly Irish and Italian as well as French-Canadian. All cultures came together for a cocktail based on cranberry juice and rum, two New England favorites. Served warm, its tart blend of juices and hint of spice push back icy weather and boost the spirits of devoted fans. I’ll be talking more about the book at Greentail Table  this week, so if you’re in the Boston area, call to reserve a seat!

The Snow Blower (1982)
Serves 6

4 cups (1 quart) Ocean Spray cran-apple juice
2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about 1/2 lemon)
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves or nutmeg
1/3 cup rum (optional)
6 slices lemon

  1. In a large saucepan over medium heat, mix together the cranapple, lemon juice, and spice. Turn off the heat; stir in the rum (if using).
  2. Pour into mugs garnished with lemon slices or into insulated vacuum bottles for serving outdoors.
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About heritagerecipebox

I am named after my great-grandmother, who only prepared two dishes, according to anyone who remembers: hamburgers shaped like squares and peanut butter sandwiches. Fast forward 100 years and 500 miles north from my hometown of Richmond, Virginia to Boston, Massachusetts. Somehow, I ended up with a cooking gene as well as an interest in history and family stories. I have worked as a journalist and published three cookbooks plus a memoir. This blog gives me a chance to share family recipes and stories -- and other American recipes with a past. What do you have to share?
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