‘Shake Until Frost Forms’

Lemon cocktail CharlestonIn the 19th century, British sailors used to mix their rations of lime juice (to prevent scurvy) with rum, creating the gimlet and other gin-lime cocktails. This Cool o’ the Evening cocktail from the Charleston Receipts (The Junior League of Charleston, 1950) uses the same citrus-gin idea but replaces lime with lemon and adds a decidedly landlubber ingredient: fresh mint. Add seltzer for a variation, but you can’t really go wrong with this basic combination of tart and sweet – even on a warm evening.


Cool o’ the Evening (1950)Lemon cocktail Charleston mint

Makes 1 drink

1 sprig mint
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1/2 teaspoon sugar
2 ounces light rum

Crush the mint in a shaker [I used a mortar and pestle and then scraped the mint into the shaker]. Add the other ingredients, using finely chopped ice and shake until frost forms. Serve in a chilled glass.

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About heritagerecipebox

I am named after my great-grandmother, who only prepared two dishes, according to anyone who remembers: hamburgers shaped like squares and peanut butter sandwiches. Fast forward 100 years and 500 miles north from my hometown of Richmond, Virginia to Boston, Massachusetts. Somehow, I ended up with a cooking gene as well as an interest in history and family stories. I have worked as a journalist and published three cookbooks plus a memoir. This blog gives me a chance to share family recipes and stories -- and other American recipes with a past. What do you have to share?
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